Ways to Connect With Your Ancestors

Today I want to talk about ways you can connect with your ancestors. For me this is a fun topic because you are continuing a legacy from a long time ago. Or maybe not so long ago. It depends on how far back you were able to trace your ancestry. This also gives you something to do with all of that information.

So, let’s get started, shall we?

  1. Learn their language. Look at where your ancestors are from and learn their language, if you can.
  2. Listen to the music that was popular in their day and in the region they’re from. My grandmother from Germany loves polka. I personally don’t care for it, but my three year old loves it.
  3. Try some cultural dishes. You can use Pinterest or Google and find great recipes. I enjoy making Paprikash like my German grandmother did when I was little.
  4. Hang pictures. If you have pictures of your ancestors hang them up instead of just looking at them on a screen. My parents and inlaw’s have pictures of their grandparents hanging up and it’s great to see them and allows me to tell my kids about their great, great grandparents.
  5. Write down or print stories you find about your ancestors and put them in a book. One day someone else in your family will thank you.
  6. Tell their stories to your children and grandchildren, even if you don’t think they’re listening. You may be surprised.
  7. Learn an old fashioned craft that your ancestors may have enjoyed. A lot of them, such as knitting, are becoming popular again.


How do you keep your ancestor’s memories alive?

 

Author: Dawn Mc

I'm a wife, mom, and so much more. I enjoy remodeling, decorating, genealogy, reading, and knitting. My husband and I have three children and many pets. We live in rural Alabama.

2 thoughts on “Ways to Connect With Your Ancestors”

  1. Thanks for providing seven excellent ideas. During winter months we engage in genealogical research and share our findings- pictures and stories- with the children. My wife’s grandfather loved Wagner and frequently quoted Faust, but you would have to know Faust to know he was quoting, so reading the books they read can be beneficial. And “Wagner Sunday” is now a periodic tradition in our home.

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